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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)
challenge that harvard business school faces today? >> business education in america itself has become stagnant. all of the growth in business schools is in places like china and india and brazil and eastern europe. we're a great american business school in a great american century. people came to the united states because they thought that this was the center of management practice and management innovation. but now if you were to try and educate leaders who have to operate in the world in what i you this of as this new global century of business by teaching them just about american education, i think we would be irresponsible to our mission of educating leaders who make a difference in the world. >> in a nutshell the biggest challenge that you face is competition? >> yes. it seems surprising. you would think there isn't a competition for harvard business school, but people are coming up with different models. we have students, all 900 of our students in the first year are currently in january scattered all around the world, trying to understand globalization. they've all been asked t
health care, not talking about education, but you are showing the two guns, because you're trying to solidify to those voters who vote based upon guns, that to me is crazy. and so if you're going to get criticized, you're going to praise guns, you're going to get criticized. so, look, i understand that -- >> but just because someone says that guns are okay does not mean that they are advocating mass shootings like in newtown. >> look -- >> that's aggressive. that's bullying and far worse, some might say. >> last i checked, politics is a rough and tumble business. and i have seen far worse when it comes to commercials. but, again, the point you're making is, when you have a commercial and you want to tout guns on one hand, expect the opposite reaction on the other. >> rohan, i have to say, if that ad is okay, maybe using -- i mean, the other ads that the nra ran that were offensive about the president's children, all these ads seem to be problematic. >> i find that ad really infuriating for this reason. we have some deep, deep problems that drive crime and violence in this society.
said, i'm going to do it in health care, education and energy. now think about that, health care is one-sixth, and then you control the production and the price and you control everything and he tried to with cap and trade but failed. and education is the future. you control the three elements there and you've goten what lennon would call the commanding heights of a post industrial society. that's what he said he wanted to do. but you don't remember this because unlike me, you have real lives, you don't have to watch everything the man says, i do for my sins and they clearly are many, but he sprinkled that speech and the subsequent speeches until the georgetown speech with a phrase, the new foundation, which was never picked up on and never remembered, but it was in there. in fact, the name of the speech when they give out the printed version of it was called the new foundation. he already saw himself one month into the presidency as a successor to the new deal and the new frontier. he wanted this appalachian, the new foundation, to be what obama is and would be. so it shows you how ide
code, immigration to education, he promised reform. >> we will support democracy from the americas to the middle east because our interests compel us on behalf of those who long for freedom. >> every word was meant to reinforce his aggressive agenda. >> our agenda is not complete until are gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law, for if we are created equal, the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> although racial equality was front and center, i think a lot of the second term will be devoted to other things. >> the president takes one last look, noting he will not see this again. will not ever be the focus of the 9000 person parade. he could barely stop himself from dancing, one last night to celebrate his historic presidency before he begins what is expected to be a huge fight with congress. >> president obama's speech dealt mostly with domestic issues. there was not much on foreign policy. let's take a listen to what he did have to say. >> we will uphold our values through strength of arm and rule of law. we will show the courage to
educate the public of the complexities of the british tax code, and does the public really care about those intricacies? probably not. so, on the one hand, by educating the public, you look defensive. by not educating them, then you're almost encouraging them to think that you are a big, greedy, terrible company trying to exploit your workers. it's a very difficult thing to play. >> big numbers expected later on from starbucks. >> aaron, thank you, thank you. do stay with us. there's much more to come here on "g.m.t." our science correspondent explains why biscuits provide a clue to the link between dogs and their canine ancestors. >> now, to the controversial construction of winter in airland, as they're being built to power homes in the u.k. there are combines the turbines stretching hundreds of feet into the air could damage the irish countryside. our environment correspondent, matt mcgrath, reports now from the irish republic. >> one shining light in ireland's economic gloom is green energy, especially wind, where investment is booming all across the landscape. today's deal is par
talked about the government that we won which is infrastructure, education, regulation and the good things and recognize the government can't solve all the problems, i thought that was a reaching out, if you will, a shout to the tea party right that's rejectionist. >> as we saw in pennsylvania, and professional that morning there's so much of this willingness to win the election by the republicans, they know they're headed into trouble. many like lebanon, take the fences down. okay, we're never going to be popular again so we're going to have to rig it. >> sean: so it's the gettysburg address, obama. republicans are going to have to steal elections. that's how bad nbc's gotten, that's the coverage. >> a couple of points about this quote, unquote news network and this quote, unquote newsman. on the gettysburg address, chris mathews has it it exactly wrong. he has the opposite. the gettysburg address was an attempt at healing of nation' wounds at the end of the civil war. obama's speech yesterday was a left wing declaration of war against the movement. and it was opposite. after the r
they are so close to to the changing social make up. who is the educated workforce and the united states anymore? it's mostly women, more and more diverse. if you work it exxon and mobil and go on to your family thanksgiving dinner and say i work and exxon mobile, they suck in their breath in distain a worry, you know, that is not a winning strategy. something has to give. i'm not sure that they think that. >> it seems to me that kind of we are who we are in take-it-or-leave-it, we really don't care, has that backfired? having come a seems that could have been a force to cultivate more distrust and distaste and helped make them, as you say in the book, you know, public enemy number one. >> yeah. well, it is a great question and a kind of complicated one. one of my goals as a reporter was to try to understand the best record and think about what it was like to be so unpopular. does it matter? because their default view is it doesn't matter to my to select a statement. we are we are. in truth i think there are consequences. part of it is talent recruitment and retention in the real world,
? >> what i mean is that my education, i have been looking at old movies that i love. we speak about the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of the people. so i said to the people, no, we have to be like everyone else. in london, it was completely different, and it still is. more distance that makes them, for me, more fascinating than the french. >> we want to take questions from the audience, but i did just want to ask you a quick question about your work in movies because that has been so extraordinarily exceptional. i think probably a lot of people --
into education to teach children reading and writing. before all else, we must show them that there is another way to live. >> from local it -- for local teenagers, life in the high-rise estates tends to be bleak. they are all too aware that taking a stand means taking a risk. >> at one concert, the audience yelled "viva la camorra" at us. another time, i was pretty scared when does from a gang decided they had to show us how great the camorra is. fortunately, nothing happened, and we had to carry on. >> the band has made a name for itself beyond labels. they all still live with their parents. they cannot yet make a living with their music, said they take jobs, but they are working on their next album. their fight continues. >> we europeans love our islands. they are among our favorite holiday destinations, but in our new series, we want to take you off the beaten track and to places that have more to offer than beautiful coastlines and resorts. our first report takes us to croatia. >> the day begins early. in winter, the island is almost deserted. only five monks reside in the old monastery.
and greet newcomers from france. the education center organizes the internships year. demand is high right now. what's a lot of the french are retracted by the culture of the cheap cost of living, the possibility that you can do everything. click she has been in berlin for 20 years now. she moved for love and state. even so, she still misses france a lot. it's a common topic when she gets together with her french friend. both mess life and in particular, the lightness of the french way of life. >> i miss the feeling you get when you go shopping in the markets in france in the summertime and how easy it is to make contact with people, how easy it is for people to approach. >> during those first few days, i had to change. you have to communicate a bit more subtle way. for instance, had to say "no" in a more pleasant way. cut stealing home in both. hoping the countries will grow even closer. >> i wish there was even more cooperation, more joint projects, meetings, exchanges. anything and everything helping us to expand. >> of course there will still sometimes be some understanding. odds are a
by a mob. then, talked about the government we won, which is infrom a structure, education, regulation, then recognize government can't solve all of the problems. i thought that is reaching out, to the tea party right rejectionists. >> we saw in pennsylvania there is so much of the willingness to rig the election. they know they're heading into trouble and it's almost like lebanon. you know? and when i see them doing it, we're never going to be popular again so, we're going to have to rig it so gettysburg address, obama. republicans are going to have to steal elections? that is how bad nbc has gotten that. is their coverage. >> a couple points about this quote, unquote news network. on the gettysburg address, chris matthews has it exactly wrong. just the opposite. gettiesberg address was an attempt at healing the nation's wounds at the end of the civil war. obama's speech, yesterday, was a left wing declaration of war against conservative movement. so it was the opposite. as for the rigging charge this is classic msnbc. going back to 2004 with keith onerman refusing to concede ohio goi
because of my experiences being educated in the west and looking at how western systems did it it was the rule of law. i was surprised by western think tanks and the european ambassadors in our country where they say that is very difficult. you think? i mean, this has been a major challenge and you can't have this by waving a magic wand. it will take hard work so that people start to, for the next elections, vote for candidates because they're on left to right of these particular issues. so, that political party culture, that is the major challenge. and where we're starting from low down in jordan, we're still steps ahead of many countries in the middle east. so, it's going to be tough for all of us. but that's the only way that i think we can do it. >> your majesty, thank you very much. this was a fascinating conversation. >> thank you. >>> that was jordan's king abdullah ii. >>> when we come back, new attacks in algeria have made many talk about the return of al qaeda. but the facts don't quite support the hyperbole. support the hyperbole. i'll explain. [ watch ticking ] [
is expected to cover education funding upgrading the state's infrastructure. we are live from the state capitol. >> reporter: good morning. yes, today's state of the state will be a whole lot different than the state of the state address last year. remember that last year the governor was in a full court press all year to try to convince voters to approve a tax hike to deal with california's bumming. well, he successfully succeeded in doing that. so now his clout couldn't be lier and today we expect him to outline his vision on other issues beyond what last year was which was all about taxes and that's going to include as you said education, a big one. he is going to reveal a plan we expect that will offer more money and resources to poorer schools or those student who are more in need than others and also to address public universities to try to compel them to cut costs to students as well as making courses more prevalent online. infrastructure is another big one as he is expected to push for high speed rail and to talk act water issues and trying to build two massive tunnels to move w
more short-term as well as more structural limits long-term like education and research. >> this is the issue that everyone is dealing with around the world. many nations, trying to figure out do you do austerity or do you invest in some of these very important areas such as education and is infrastructure? would you like to see more stimulus coming out of the ecb? >> i let the ecb decide on its monetary policy. i have read carefully the report and christine legarde's statements about the need to continue with accommodative monetary policy. to my mind, it's important that our policy mixes correct overall and it means that we need to continue with smart and prudent fiscal consolidation because it's so high, about 90% in europe. it is also a drag on growth. and at the same time, we have to ensure that the composition of consolidation is growth friendly so that we did not hamper elements like education, innovation and research. it's very important for future, medium and long-term economic growth. >> are there sectors in europe that you think will drive the growth more so th
. . the kind of crisis we have in the economy is not really so much for highly skilled, highly educated people who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice quest
. ♪ >>> this morning we come together to hear about the president's plans to strengthen education. >> today's flashback takes us back to 1998 at an event that started out pretty much like any other white house news conference, but it turned out to be anything but normal. when president clinton made a statement about his new education initiative and then on his own launched into one of the most infamous presidential lines ever uttered. >> i have to go back to work on my state of the union speech and i worked on it pretty late last night, but i want to say one thing to the american people. i want you to listen to me. i'm going to say this again. i did not have sexual relations with that woman, miss lewinsky. i never told anybody to lie, nota single time, ever. these allegations are false, and i need to go back to work for the american people. thank you. >> you almost forgot the conviction with which he said it. the next night clinton went to capitol hill to deliver that state of the union address with no mention whatsoever of the sex scandal that was consuming his presidency. it would take until december
in a world where they're so closed to the changing social makeup of -- who is the educated work force in the united states anymore? mostly women, more and more diverse, and i you work at exxonmobil and go home to your family thanksgiving dinner and say i work at exxonmobil and half your cousins and your brothers look at you in disdain or worry, that's not a wing strategy over 30 years. so something has to give, i think. i'm not sure they think that, though. >> host: that's one of my questions, too. is that it seems to me that kind of, we are who we are and take it or leave it, don't care what everybody else thinks about that -- has that backfired on them? seems that could have been a force to cultivate more distrust and distaste, and help make them, as you say in the book, public enemy number one at pointness their history. >> guest: yeah. well, it's a great question and a kind of complicated one. i think one of my goals as a reporter was to try to understand as best i could and to think about what is it like to be so unpopular? does it matter? their default view, doesn't matter. just
through different ideas, from education, but just right off the bat, the irs has a suggested amount that you can multiply by the number of exemptions and subtract from your income. so also the main thing, gretchen, is that you're filing the right way. married, obviously a couple, married. that's a great way to file. head of household. if you are divorced, it's a little tricky. are you the head of the household for over six months? are you the primary care giver and incurring most of the cost. in which case, this child is your dependent. >> gretchen: so only one much you can claim this. >> right. >> gretchen: tax blessing number two, the child tax credit. what's that? >> so this one, you get $1,000 credit per child. gone are the days that you're passing down the money so freely to the kids. that is taxed so heavily. we know that for a fact. so let's go with this one. get in there and try and get that $1,000 tax credit. there is no forms, nothing. just put in for it. if you have more than one child, orgeat form, the 8812. it will compute that one. this one you could even get a refund
our borders to people who have all sorts of education and skills and providing a pathway to citizenship for the 11 million people. that, to me, is one of the first signs that substantively the republican party is taking to heart what you're talking about. >> it's also, though, it's the theatrics of it all, and sarah palin was more theatrics than anything else. doing stupid things and saying stupid things politically, going on facebook after gabby giffords was shot, talking about blood libel, one mistake after another. >> it wasn't just that one line. >> there were, willie geist, so many republicans that really did believe -- and i told them they were dead wrong -- they really believed the benghazi hearings, and i heard this when they were getting sworn in, saying benghazi is going to be the issue where we're really going to get the country to turn on barack obama and hillary clinton. hillary clinton killed them. and once again, a self-inflicted wound. you had a senator going out saying oh, she was just faking her tears. >> oh, my god. >> and we do that time and time and t
for education. we also must insure economic development and political progress, political development. these things and these principles are very important, and this is why the arab spring took place at the end of the day. and i believe that such principles are still not respected in our countries, such freedoms are not yet respected. we still have a long way to go. regardless of what the west thinks or does not think, we don't really -- we should not really mind what the west says. the west can speak and say, and we also can speak and say whatever we think. however, i believe that the reform process must start from us, must start from the arab world. so that we would bring back the human dignity to each citizen. we must respect individuals, and we must not force any citizen to do anything that he or she does not want to do. i believe that it's the arab spring happened because of the oppression that we were living under. that oppression took away our freedoms, our liberties, our human rights, and that is why i believe that we need this revolution, we needed this revolution, and we nee
, whether it's global health or whether it is education, we are doing things that are making a difference in people's lives with respect to those rights. i am absolutely committed -- usaid gets criticized and there have been some obvious problems with our contractor-aide relationships in the past. the committee i i think did superb work in putting a -- out a report with respect to that, but i think we can do more than we are doing today. >> i appreciate that. we had -- you just had the discussion with senator risch on russia, we have seen some slippage since the breakup of the cold war ending, you mentioned secretary kissinger's comments in 1994, the complexity of this arrangement. we have seen slippage. we have seen slippage in russia with their human rights tensions. there's been slippage among our allies in france, what's happened in hungary with recent elections in the government changing, trying to change the constitutional protections. slippage in the ukraine with imprisoning their opposition. our roolingsshep -- relationship where other countries can be ma thure enough where we can
of education investigated. notre dame agreed to change its response to sex assaults and is still required to file updates with the government. >> certainly there could be no criminal proceeding after lizzy's death but there could be hope in a place that has a disciplinary process whose mission is to seek truth. >> as the notre dame mission statement says, truth for its own sake. it's important to say that no one has or ever will be criminally charged in any of these cases. to critics and to the seebergs, this is more about accountability. wolf? >> sara, thanks for that. good information for all of our viewers to digest. >>> will the north try to carry them out? stand by. are easy with free pip from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ thank you. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we c
an educated guess as to what's happened and confronts myers with it at the first night party. he says, "let's talk about this quietly in the cellar." "but," you'll say, "did he fetch a piece of string with him on the off-chance?" what do you reckon? you usually have an opinion. sir, there's something else you need to know. sounds exciting. you're not getting married? no, sir, it's about simon monkford. what about him? how long have you known? since the call from the met. is that what that was? the final confirmation-- date, place, time. why the hell didn't you tell me then? because the last time i mentioned your wife you made it very clear to me that i wasn't to mention the subject again. this is different. this is purely professional. how can that be? what were you frightened of? that i might go barging into the interview room and batter the living daylights out of the man? i think i'd be tempted under the circumstances. well, maybe i'd be tempted too. but it wouldn't happen. shall i tell you why? why? because you're a good cop and you'd stop me. as it is, all you've
environment. great education. dublin is a great city. they will build themselves out. they have done a great job coming back from the bailout. the way they're doing it is focusing on jobs, jobs, jobs. liz: you're one of some 20, not many firms who have been granted the ability to do trading on behalf of the federal reserve and behalf of the government. if they were to finally tighten rates, would that help your business a bit? i know it might hurt the commercial real estate business but, you know, rates at zero to 1/4% have killed certain segments of business out there. >> of course. i mean you have a two-year note at .2. what kind of rate is .2? that is not interest rate. you have a million dollar investment and u.s. treasury and buy coffee. liz: that changed under my sofa seats. >> what you're going to see when this $7 trillion of this liquidity, quantitative easing, that the federal government has thrown in, sloshing around causing these rates to be so, so, low, it really made u.s. treasurys a noninvestable good. it is a storage facility. it is not really an investment. what will happen,
. >> you're self-educated, self-taught? >> mm-hmm. >> have you published any research? >> no. >> frankly, dr. ecklund, you have nothing to base your results on. there's no clinical trial, there's no-- there's no blind study. there are no medical papers published. >> that doesn't make any difference. >> ecklund told us breakthroughs with stem cells aren't published in scientific journals because of a conspiracy of drug companies and governments that he had trouble defining. that's when we told him we bought cells from his lab. when your cells are delivered, they're functioning, living stem cells? >> yes. >> we purchased some stem cells from stem tech labs six months or so ago and had them delivered to duke university, which did tests on the stem cells. and they determined that the stem cells were dead. >> well, they must not have handled them appropriately, then. >> you're thinking that you handled them appropriately, but the stem cell laboratories at duke university did not? >> that would be my assumption, yeah. >> i don't think that there's any chance they were damaged in shipment. >> w
donated $100 million to newark schools said he admired christie's leadership on education and reform. not happy with the endorsement and is calling on zuckerberg to cancel the event. >> absurd. >> "the birmingham news," the question that i know sam stein and all of his connecticut friends are asking this morning, how did legendary alabama coach bear bryant get his signature houndstooth hat? well, butch valdone was his friend. he says he picked it out to match his jacket and the coach started wearing it with anything. butch said bear was hopeless when it came to fashion and he even labeled his clothes so the coach could figure out which articles went with which. >> how did that make its way into the morning reads, that piece? i don't know. >> because joe has the same issue. >> i have the same issue. everything is numbered here. you think i just threw this sweater on? >> no, it's too good. >> come on. >> a lot of thought went into that. >> exactly. >> things like that just don't happen. >> numbers. >> there's a mathematical formula behind this beauty. >> there is. don't say that math c
organizing for action, a 501 c-4 education organization, ostensibly, and they're going to be helping drive the obama agenda out there on a very grass roots level much like they did with the campaign. >> harris: and why does that matter? >> it matters because i think you know, listen, four years ago, president stood on the west end of the capitol and said he would set out remaking america, as if america needed remaking and started pushing, a political agenda. and inencumbered i think he's going to be aggressive. >> harris: we've heard about the agenda the next four years, hearing things like reduction in our debt, so on, so forth. a couple of things we haven't heard, creation of jockbs and what's happening in north africa and foreign policy, at least not yet. where should they make a move? >> if the president is true to his word, he needs to do something about the economy, about job creation. there are more unemployed or underemployed people in this country today than there were when the president first took office. we've seen a 33% increase in spending on welfare programs. the african-amer
in the bronx to her education at princeton and yale
the founders and framers could have taken a ragtag band of poorly educated farmers and ill-equipped black smiths and defeat the world's greatest military? not ben franklin, not james madison, not thomas jefferson, only george. so george is a great, great man. and i think part of the reason historians haven't focused on his marriage and affairs because somehow it would be seen as diminishing him, and doesn't every great leader claim to be a self-made man? as a matter of fact, a lot of them are mother-made men or wife-made men or mistress-made men. washington could have been all of the above. when george was a young man, he had a great, great goal of being a gentleman planter and an officer in the british military. he wanted to be, you know, very important. the problem for george was this. while his father, augustine, did okay, george was the first-born son of the second marriage. and when augustine died when george was a little boy, augustine left almost everything to his sons from his first marriage because augustine had rotten marriage with his second wife. she was sort of a high mainten
, 75% are to physically unfit, not educated enough, or have criminal backgrounds. if we want to get the best in military service, we need to make sure that women are part of the population. >> you have to open the door for everybody. they would have to meet physical fitness standards. they're not actually lowering standards. few served in iraq. >> i did. >> you were shot at. >> we took small arms fire and direct fire. that is true. >> you were in a combat position? >> that's right, i went on patrol with the infantry. the only thing that mattered was the fact that i could speak arabic and help them accomplish the mission. my gender was meaningless. >> what was the attitude and of your superiors to the fact that you were effectively in a combat position? it did they recognize the fact that you were serving on the front lines in a combat role? >> as a woman, i would not be in combat. eventually when we realized that me going on combat foot patrols without a flak jacket was a bad idea. i started borrowing a front plate from someone who stayed back behind. >> you had to borrow a front pl
is not a panacea. we have to place a lot more emphasis on human capital, particularly educating younger kids, not just college-educated kids but kids who get good vocational training for the kind of jobs that we're going to need. we're going to need to not just rely on energy but a whole lot of other things to make us competitive, including infrastructure. >> okay. we're going leave it -- actually, one final question. hillary clinton, how's she feeling? >> hillary clinton is feeling great. we just had a ceremony where we gave her a football helmet for her to wear around the house. but she has done a fabulous job. she'll probably be leaving soon. we'll all miss her. but i think one of the things that she's done and i want to emphasize this, the state department now is playing an active role in supporting american companies around the world. and i think that is one of the very important legacies. other governments are supporting their companies, the state department and other -- >> are you going to stick around? >> i hope to stay around for a while longer. >> i imagine we may see you on the "s
and the educational system and looking to start their life and begin their role as a rent provider for their family and holding down a job so that they can participate in life as someone capable of paying their bills and buying a house and getting married and raising children and providing education, that number for those people, those young people is over 55%. more than one of every two young people in spain are without employment. on the streets, nothing to do, no job to go to. we see the austerity measures having to be imposed in the united kingdom. italy is in and out of the news in terms of its financial status. there are questions about france, questions about other countries. germany is struggling along with very little growth even though it's seen as an economic provider and dynamo at the level of growth which is so anemic, there are questions being raised as to whether and how much they can do to help the european situation. but even aside from the potentially catastrophic debt bomb that continues to particular away, if we fail to get spending under control in the short term, our economy w
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)